Winterizing The Water System

Winterizing The Water System Tom McMahan 9/1/1998 Hull #: 29 I probably use more antifreeze (AF) than is really necessary, but I don’t mind if it avoids worrying about a broken pipe below the floorboards. I just pump each tank as dry as possible and then drain the water heater. I then re-plumb the water heater, bypassing it to avoid having to waste all the AF it takes to fill it. This requires buying a couple of extra fittings and a short length of the rigid tubing used in the 380 fresh water system. Parts are available by special order from Whale via West Marine. Then, each tank gets about two gallons of AF. On the 380, the shortest run from the manifold to a faucet is to the galley faucet. I open the valve for each tank separately and in turn and run water until pink appears at the

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Dutchman/Boom Lift

Dutchman/Boom Lift Dave Peffer 11/1/1997 Hull #: 20 Earlier hull numbers have an adjustable two-part boom lift designed to permit setting up the Dutchman exactly. This has a nasty tendency to shake out of the cam cleat at the end of the boom, and re-setting it with the sail luffing is no picnic. I opted to set the system up perfectly, then whipped the two parts of the boom lift together just above the cam cleat. No more loose line and the whipping can easily be cut when necessary.

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Vibration Under Power

Vibration Under Power Jim Jaeschke 5/1/1998 Hull #: 73 Last summer I always felt that there was just a little too much vibration when under power. This winter I took the propeller off sent it to Michigan Wheel. They found that there was a burr in the taper of the propeller. I also took some valve grinding compound and ground the tapers on the shaft and propeller to match. This helped to reduce the vibration level.

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Dodger Alternative

Dodger Alternative Dave Peffer 10/1/1998 Hull #: 20 Those of us on lakes less massive than the Great ones usually don’t need a dodger, but would like to keep dry when it rains. I needed a bimini (this is not an option, but a survival item in Texas), so I had the canvas shop make up a windshield. It zips onto the forward edge of the bimini and attaches to the coachroof forward of the companionway and just aft of the traveler with a plastic track/bolt rope setup identical to a dodger’s. This works like a charm and stores in a felt-lined tube in the lazarette when not needed.

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Use That Old Teak Cockpit Table

Use That Old Teak Cockpit Table Jim Jaeschke 5/1/1998 Hull #: 73 Have an old teak pedestal table in the garage? I took mine apart: the ”four-holer”, which attached to the Edson pedestal guard with a stainless strap curved at both ends, fits our pedestal, too. Slide it down until it rests on the instrument pod and you have a great place for drinks, binoculars, a horn, gloves and whatever. Add rubber holders on each side for a hand-held VHF and a cell phone. Add a “Holdz-it” on one side for the GPS. How about a holder for the bell? We added a brass eye for a small nautical kerosene lamp, nice for romantic dinners. When we’re securing the boat the four-holer comes right off and hangs on one of the hooks in the lazarette. This is wonderful! Now you’ve got a teak table top, perhaps with folding leaves. Lose

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Dock Side Water Connection

Dock Side Water Connection Dave Peffer 7/1/1998 Hull #: 20 A few weeks ago we were asked by the Coast Guard to display a life jacket for each passenger, requiring us to take one of the PFD bags out of the lazarette. The gal who put it back in didn’t see that sneaky blue tube, and hung up the bag on it, then pushed extra hard. Result: the right-angle fitting from the regulator cracked. When we fired up the fresh water to do dishes the pump ran on and on, but we had no pressure. It took awhile to find this blasted leak! I have temporarily plugged the end of the tube after removing the fittings, but have to replace the thing if I ever want to use the dockside connection for water. Those who have not (yet) broken it can avoid the problem by disconnecting the blue tube, turning

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Staying Warm

Staying Warm Scott Brear 5/1/1998 Hull #: 31 After good meals, a key factor in crew comfort is adequate cabin heat. What a treat a warm cabin is after a cold watch…and how nice it is to be able to dry clothes at sea! We have had experience with diesel heaters before in our Catalina 42 and friends’ boats. They are very economical to run (about 0.5 liters per hour), are quiet/safe in operation, and offer loads of nice hot air. An Eberspacher Model D3LC was chosen for its heat output and reputation for quality. They are readily available in the USA through selected dealers. This model was designed for a slightly smaller boat, but installation space and other factors must be considered. Finding a way to mount the heater, locate the exhaust, and run the heat output required careful planning. After much thought, we settled on mounting the main

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Dock Line Storage

Dock Line Storage Jim Jaeschke 5/1/1998 Hull #: 73 We made a locker for storing dock lines by removing the starboard holder for the spare propane tank. This opened up a large spot for dock lines in the unusable spot underneath the deck. If you do this, it is important to seal this area off since water can pour into the boat. We did this by fiber glassing in plywood walls to totally seal off the interior of the boat. The drain hose used for the spare propane tank locker was then fitted to this new compartment.

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Spare Propane Locker Becomes Cockpit Cooler

Spare Propane Locker Becomes Cockpit Cooler Dave Peffer 11/1/1998 Hull #: 20 We rarely need two propane bottles aboard, and we don’t want to open our refrigerator more often than absolutely necessary. My solution was to line the outside of the spare (starboard) propane locker with insulation, working from below in the lazarette. I used three wraps of roll insulation (from a home store) which sandwiches bubble-wrap between layers of foil, lightly gluing it and wrapping it in place with nylon strapping. The bottom was covered with expanded foam insulation board, and the joints sealed withlatex expanding foam insulation (Find this stuff! It cleans up with water!). The locker cover was lined with the same rigid board insulation. Here I cut one piece to fit inside the water-exclusion fiddle, another to extend down just into the round part of the locker, using contact cement to hold them in place on

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Anchor Detent

Anchor Detent Dave Peffer 10/1/1998 Hull #: 20 The anchor locker provides no place to install a chain lock, which is required to keep the anchor locked on the roller underway. I made one up as follows: a short length of 3/16″ stainless wire (length depends on the length of your anchor stock) with a lifeline pelican hook (West Marine model #543132, which adjusts in length) swaged on one end, a stainless thimble nice-pressed on the other. A galvanized shackle attaches this to the bitter-end padeye in the anchor locker. The pelican hook goes through a chain link as close as possible to the anchor, and the adjustment on the hook allows this to be snug. The anchor is not going to fall overboard. This can also be used to snub the chain and allow you to transition the chain to the gypsy while raising the anchor if you do

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