Sparkles and Wine

Sparkles and Wine Gary L. Snyder 10/11/2004 Hull #: 323 No red wine for you!!! I know it may seen harsh in a Soup Natzyish way but we have always had one rule on board concerning wine. It is not like we are connoisseurs favoring the lighter toned fermentations nor prejudice of color, tones or whatever. The whites and roses’, dry or sweet, sparkling or not seem to do fine. The fact is I am really not much of a drinker. Nor is my wife. Either of our two, almost 30 something, kids could drink us under the table. But, our friends, family and clients really enjoy it. They even expect it to be served on such a fine craft as our Romanza a Catalina 380. It is beautiful and comfortable with plenty of creature comforts, full instrumentation, radar, flat screen tv, stereo, private quest quarters, shower, refrigeration, microwave, all

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How do you get to Mexico

Lloyd Causey 10/11/2004 Hull #: 220 Where do you begin when you are going to do a race to Isla Mujeres, off Mexico’s Yucatan coast? Officially, the race was to start in Pensacola in May. We began our trip in West End, LA in February. At least that’s when we began talking, planning, working and scheming. There were so many things to do to a basically sound boat that is raced almost every weekend. Everything was coming together smoothly until our C380, JAMBALAYA, found the bottom at West End outlet one rough Sunday and bent her rudder shaft. Working with Catalina and our yard, the job was accomplished in near recordime. Catalina built a rudder in one week and our yard found a place in their schedule to get it done. Back on schedule with new sails arriving (there are never too many sails), new sheets spliced, new hardware installed,

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Improving the C-380 Single Line Reefing System

Improving the C-380 Single Line Reefing System Tom McMahn 8/1/2004 Hull #: 29 Many C-380 owners have complained about the single line reefing systems installed on our boats. I am no exception. The reefing system installed on many modern Catalina models, like those on most other production boats, is difficult to use and results in less than satisfactory reefed sail shape. Rigging the boat so reefing can be done from the cockpit is a great safety goal, but the implementation leaves a lot of room for improvement. Tom McMahan clew block side The friction created by the reefing line twice passing through the reef cringles, and that in all the blocks used to turn the line back to the cockpit, make taking a reef a real chore. Perhaps even worse, the same friction points make shaking out the reef nearly impossible without help from the halyard winch. [Note: any reef

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More on Spinnaker & Jib Poles

More on Spinnaker & Jib Poles Warren Elliott 5/1/2004 Hull #: 44 As a follow-up to Steve’s article, I did some further enquiries on spinnaker/jib poles and cars. For the older C380’s with Z-Spar masts, Julian Crisp at US Spars [was Z-Spar, tel: 386 462-3760] indicates that, for the standard [non-furling] mast, the cost is about $250 for a car and short section of track. They also sell the same track in a long version [4 meters], for those who want to store their boat’s pole on the mast. US Spars’ furling mast uses a simpler approach in which the car can be added directly to the mast groove, and is about $170; installing this car does not require stepping the mast. They also sell complete poles with fittings, at better prices than the big catalog stores, per Julian. [But remember that shipping long items means

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Basic “Go-Fasts” For The C380

Basic “Go-Fasts” For The C380 Steve Dublin 5/1/2004 Hull #: 84 We’ve found our C-380, “Caretta” (hull # 84), to be a very able club racer, particularly in offshore events. When her skipper and crew are reasonably attentive, she can sail to her 120 PHRF rating. The stock Catalina 380 comes well fitted out with sail handling gear. However, there are some basic “go fasts” (racing equipment), which can be easily added, to help the boat sail her to her full potential. I’ve described a few of these “go fasts” below along with some installation tips learned the hard way: Adjustable Backstay Photo 3 The C-380 does not have a “bendy” rig. However, a pincer block assembly (Photo 3), connected to a 4 to 1 block & tackle, will allow you to tighten the forestay and point a little higher in moderate sea conditions. You don’t have to drill any

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Engine Preventive Maintenance

Engine Preventive Maintenance George LaForge 5/1/2004 Hull #: 147 Recently, on the SailNet C380 discussion list, there was mention of chaffing of engine hoses. You’ll appreciate the minimal expense and time involved in adding chaffing protection to your engine’s cooling and fuel hoses. If you need to purchase a replacement hose from Westerbeke or Yanmar, be prepared for sticker shock. To protect the hoses, buy a few feet of one-inch diameter clear hose and a package of eight-inch plastic wire ties from Home Depot or Lowes. You’ll be surprised by the amount of hose needed. Inspect every hose for potential contact with other objects. Where one does touch [or might with vibration], cut a piece of the clear tubing long enough to protect the engine hose, split the tubing length-wise, and secure the tubing to the hose with a couple of wire ties. Trim the ties using wire cutters. On

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Smart Fuel Gauge

Smart Fuel Gauge Earle Ellefsen 5/1/2004 Hull #: 271 The following is from Earl Effelsen –Warren I have always kept a fuel log for our 2000 C380 (#271), Valkyrie, and know that fuel consumption can range from 0.6 to 1.0 gph (average 0.85 gph) depending on conditions. I am also well aware that the stock fuel gauge is not linear and that, although my tank is rated at 34 gals, when the gauge reads 1/4, there are only about four gals remaining. So, I was particularly annoyed when I recently ran out of fuel despite my calculations indicating that I should still have another hours worth of fuel. At about this time, I saw an ad for the Cruz Pro FU30 Smart Fuel Gauge and ordered one from the e-Marine, Inc. web site for $169. This gauge learns the shape of the tank and, via its digital readout, can accurately

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Remote Oil Filter

Remote Oil Filter Earl Poe 5/1/2004 Hull #: 140 Remote Oil Filter The oil filters on both of our fleets engine types [Westerbeke and Yanmar] are horizontally mounted, resulting in some oil spillage when changing filters. This remote adapter allows you to relocate the filter so that its feed/return end is up, avoiding any messy spills. Further, the filters location on our Westerbekes is a bit awkward, as Captain Earl Poe so aptly describes below, so the remote filter also allows for a much more “ergonomic” location. –Warren The idea of a remote location for mounting an oil filter was first investigated by Tom Lincoln on Ridge Runner, so he gets the credit. The servicing of our oil filters is, to say the least, awful! Mounting the filter in a vertical direction on an easily accessible bulkhead would save time, knuckles, and the environment. Covich-Williams (800-833-3132) of Seattle sells just

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Hatch and Portlight Issues

Hatch And Portlight Issues Warren Elliott 2/1/2004 Hull #: 44 While most of us realize that our hatches and portlights will not last forever, on the other hand a certain, and at least moderate, period of trouble-free performance is expected for new equipment. This is apparently not the case with regard to crazing of the acrylic. To be sure there’s also problems with leaks–there always will be with any exposed openable equipment on a boat. But crazing, a natural, usually slow, deterioration of the acrylic where fine lines appear randomly, should not strike for a few years. And when it does, we should see only minor amounts adding slowly over the years. Of course, this will vary depending principally on exposure to sunlight, so those of you in southern climes are most susceptible. However, quite a large group of your fellow captains have indicated significant crazing appearing in their acrylics,

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Automating Refrigerator Startup and Shutdown with a Battery Combiner

Automating Refrigerator Startup and Shutdown with a Battery Combiner George LaForge 2/1/2004 Hull #: 147 We only run the refrigerator on Freebird when power is available from a charging source. That source is either dockside power or the engine alternator. I try never to run the refrigerator only from battery power. [George- maybe your fridge needs an insulation upgrade; Catalina has a procedure for installing expandable foam–Warren]. Not wanting to run down a battery, yet at the same time wanting to keep beverages cold, we developed a routine: as soon as the engine was started someone would need to go below and switch on the circuit breaker for the refrigerator. And after the engine was shut down someone would need to go below and switch off the breaker. Most of the time the problem was remembering to switch the breaker on when the engine was started. One day while researching

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