So you want to try the ICW?

So you want to try the ICW? or What to do for your winter vacation! Bob Bierly 5/15/2005 Hull #255 In the February 2005 Mainsheet, Earle Ellefsen, our C380 Commodore was pondering how to prepare for an 8-month trip down the eastern seaboard from New England to Florida and the Bahamas or beyond. Although not having all the answers, my comments will be from the perspective of having made the major part of that trip twice in CMON WIND, our C380 hull #255. Although many pros have written extensively on the subject of an ICW trip, I will offer only my unique perspective and focus on the use of the C380 as a suitable vessel and home. I will use Earle’s rhetorical questions to direct my thoughts into various subjects that all should ponder before embarking. All of this is offered in the sure knowledge that your first trip down

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Northbound from Trinidad

Northbound from Trinidad Jim & Sue Seemann 5/15/2005 Hull #1 Sue and I flew back to Trinidad on Jan 10, 2005, to re-launch our boat (PipeDream) and begin our 2,000 mile voyage back to Florida. Here is our first installment on our northbound trip. Trinidad (Jan 10 to Feb 5) is a beautiful and prosperous tropical island located about 25 miles off the coast of South America and near the eastern border of Venezuela. The island is 10 degrees north of the equator and consequently enjoys a lush tropical climate with expansive rain forests, endless varieties of tropical plants and animals, and an annual celebration known as “Carnival”. We stayed in Chaguaramas, Trinidad for three weeks and enjoyed the island amenities while preparing and provisioning PipeDream for the voyage north. The first leg of our trip (Feb 6 to 11) took us 88 miles north to Grenada. What a contrast!!!

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Caretta Surfs to a 2nd in the Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race

Caretta Surfs to a 2nd in the 30th Annual Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race Steve Dublin Date: 5/15/2005 Hull #: 86 Caretta is a seven year old C-380 with the Z-Spar tall rig and the deeper version of the wing keel. We’ve owned her for about 3 years. We bought Caretta to use primarily for weekend day sails and summer cruises in the Bahamas. But as they say; “He goes among the fever stricken…..” After a few too many rum & cokes, following a win in the “Mother Tub” fleet during Abaco Race Week, we decided to enter Caretta in the next Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race. The sailing instructions for the 30th Annual Key West race required all boats to stay offshore of the reefs that separate Hawke Channel from the Keys. Too many racers had foundered on these reefs at night while trying to duck into

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Cruise The Bahamas in a Catalina 380!!

Cruise The Bahamas in a Catalina 380!! Tom Lincoln 5/15/2005 Hull #1 Some of you might think the 380 is marginal for such a task. Some might think it is necessary to have that heavy-duty ocean tested offshore double-ended battle ship of a cruiser. Put that notion aside. My wife Barb and I have been cruising our C-380 for three years. We departed Lake Erie and navigated the ICW and then jumped off to the Bahamas for the winter months. The C-380 has proven to be up to the task. Our background in sailing is probably like most weekend sailors. We have been sailing since 1970 in small boats. We started with day sailors that we sailed close to our hometown, Fort Thomas in Northern Kentucky, a Suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. We sailed on small lakes and the Ohio River. As members of Brookville Lake Sailing Association, we learned the

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Boat Speed Under Power – Mainsheet May 2005

Title:Boat Speed Under Power Author:Jim Jaeschke Date: 5/1/2005 Hull #: 73 Boat Speed Under Power – Engine/Transmission/Propeller Performance There has been a few lively discussions on the Sailnet C380+ list about how fast and at what RPM our boats will move under engine power. The bottom line is that your boat should cruise at 7+ knots at engine rev’s that promote long life. I’ll try to help you get there by discussing prop characteristics, tying in engine performance and, for the practical side: tachometer and boat speed instrumentation. Instrumentation In order to know our boat’s motoring performance, we need reasonably accurate instrumentation. It has been reported that the tachometer on some boats has not been calibrated, resulting in erroneous RPM readings. It is important, not only for this discussion but also for engine life, that the tach indicate engine RPM correctly. If you suspect a problem, have your boat yard

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Dutchman Boom Brake Installation and Use – Mainsheet May 2005

Dutchman Boom Brake Installation and Use Kevin Murray Mainsheet Date: 5/1/2005 Hull #: 88 The Dutchman Boom Brake is designed to control the speed of the boom as it crosses the boat during jibing. This can be a dangerous situation in moderate or higher winds. It also makes a great preventer for use when running downwind. As shown in Figure 1, this brake consists of three sheaves mounted between two plates in a triangular configuration; a line wraps around these in a serpentine fashion. The two upper sheaves are fixed and do not rotate; the lower sheave either rotates or is fixed depending on the setting of the control knob on the front of the device. When the line running through the brake is tensioned, it grips the line with greater tension yielding more grip. By adjusting the knob and/or tension, more or less braking friction is in winds below

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Genny Furling Line Controller – Mainsheet February 2005

Genny Furling Line Controller Warren Elliott Mainsheet Date: 2/1/2005 Hull #: 44 How to control my headsail’s furling line? This was one of my first challenges with our new C380. It was obvious that some sort of block and cleat arrangement was needed in that port cockpit area; but then a secondary question arose: how to accomplish this without drilling any holes in that beautiful fiberglass, and still keeping the furling line out from underfoot? Without the ability to simply ask our great Sailnet email group [Sailnet didn’t exist and I didn’t even have a PC “back then”], I set about scrounging through my voluminous “junk box”. [Much to the Admiral’s chagrin, I save all sorts of “stuff”]. I decided to concentrate on attaching “something” to the genny foot block, as it seemed to be in a good location. After quite a few visualizing exercises, a plan developed: use a

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Cracked Mast Step – Mainsheet February 2005

Cracked Mast Step-Version II Ted Sholl 2/1/2005 Hull #: 257 Cracked Mast Step – Version II This is a summary of Ted Sholl’s experience with his C380. His article was submitted for publication several issues back, but was removed due to lack of space. Subsequently it somehow “slipped through the crack” [pardon the pun]. With the passage of time, boats with this problem probably have all been discovered and repaired. However, just in case, here’s some “food for thought”. My apologies to Ted, whose full article is on our website. Shortly after taking delivery of “Sound of Silence” hull #257 in July 2000, we noticed some cracks and apparent corrosion around the circumference of the mast step [collar] that sits at the base of the mast and is attached to the cabin roof [and compression post below]. The mast fits into the collar and is held in place by a

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Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver – Mainsheet February 2005

Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver Roger Cheney 2/1/2005 Hull #: 132 Faithful readers of this column [others are to be pitied!] may recall an earlier brief article [May ’03] in which Wallace Shakun [Morning Star, C380 #12] proposed using a heavy-duty cordless drill to drive winches. He put the idea into practice using a straight-drive 1/2″ Bosch drill together with an adapter “bit”, which he developed, that mates a standard 1/2″ chuck with our winch drive socket. The idea sounded good to me, except that I felt a right-angle drill would provide an easier way to resist the high torques developed [about 500 inch-pounds]. Wallace indicated that the straight-drive version worked well, but that he was also considering the right-angle approach. Milwaukee now has a hefty right-angle drill, which develops a “bit” more torque, and which costs somewhat more [$300 vs $200]. Roger Cheney [C380 #132, “2nd Wind”] has

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Installing Portlight Screens

Installing Portlight Screens Warren Elliott Mainsheet Date: 2/1/2005 Hull #: 44 The diagrams below show the method for installing the screens for the portlights on hulls somewhere around C380 hull #200. The screens are probably the same for all 387’s and 390’s. Note that the shape of the portlights on the drawing look remarkably like the ones used on hulls less than 200. I suspect that Lewmar used whatever sketches were handy and adapted them. Bottom line is that the newer portlights should appear much more rounded at the ends, hence oval [you can see the true shape on their website]. Distinguishing features shown are “push-type” window latches [a bit difficult to tell, unless you’ve seen them first hand] and the bar or strap across the top of the screens [oval shape should have also been a distinguishing feature]. These drawings show the process that should be used when installing

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