So you want to try the ICW?

So you want to try the ICW? or What to do for your winter vacation! Bob Bierly 5/15/2005 Hull #255 In the February 2005 Mainsheet, Earle Ellefsen, our C380 Commodore was pondering how to prepare for an 8-month trip down the eastern seaboard from New England to Florida and the Bahamas or beyond. Although not having all the answers, my comments will be from the perspective of having made the major part of that trip twice in CMON WIND, our C380 hull #255. Although many pros have written extensively on the subject of an ICW trip, I will offer only my unique perspective and focus on the use of the C380 as a suitable vessel and home. I will use Earle’s rhetorical questions to direct my thoughts into various subjects that all should ponder before embarking. All of this is offered in the sure knowledge that your first trip down

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Northbound from Trinidad

Northbound from Trinidad Jim & Sue Seemann 5/15/2005 Hull #1 Sue and I flew back to Trinidad on Jan 10, 2005, to re-launch our boat (PipeDream) and begin our 2,000 mile voyage back to Florida. Here is our first installment on our northbound trip. Trinidad (Jan 10 to Feb 5) is a beautiful and prosperous tropical island located about 25 miles off the coast of South America and near the eastern border of Venezuela. The island is 10 degrees north of the equator and consequently enjoys a lush tropical climate with expansive rain forests, endless varieties of tropical plants and animals, and an annual celebration known as “Carnival”. We stayed in Chaguaramas, Trinidad for three weeks and enjoyed the island amenities while preparing and provisioning PipeDream for the voyage north. The first leg of our trip (Feb 6 to 11) took us 88 miles north to Grenada. What a contrast!!!

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Caretta Surfs to a 2nd in the Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race

Caretta Surfs to a 2nd in the 30th Annual Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race Steve Dublin Date: 5/15/2005 Hull #: 86 Caretta is a seven year old C-380 with the Z-Spar tall rig and the deeper version of the wing keel. We’ve owned her for about 3 years. We bought Caretta to use primarily for weekend day sails and summer cruises in the Bahamas. But as they say; “He goes among the fever stricken…..” After a few too many rum & cokes, following a win in the “Mother Tub” fleet during Abaco Race Week, we decided to enter Caretta in the next Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race. The sailing instructions for the 30th Annual Key West race required all boats to stay offshore of the reefs that separate Hawke Channel from the Keys. Too many racers had foundered on these reefs at night while trying to duck into

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Cruise The Bahamas in a Catalina 380!!

Cruise The Bahamas in a Catalina 380!! Tom Lincoln 5/15/2005 Hull #1 Some of you might think the 380 is marginal for such a task. Some might think it is necessary to have that heavy-duty ocean tested offshore double-ended battle ship of a cruiser. Put that notion aside. My wife Barb and I have been cruising our C-380 for three years. We departed Lake Erie and navigated the ICW and then jumped off to the Bahamas for the winter months. The C-380 has proven to be up to the task. Our background in sailing is probably like most weekend sailors. We have been sailing since 1970 in small boats. We started with day sailors that we sailed close to our hometown, Fort Thomas in Northern Kentucky, a Suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. We sailed on small lakes and the Ohio River. As members of Brookville Lake Sailing Association, we learned the

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Weaver Davits

Weaver Davits Rick Beauregard November, 2005 Hull #: 160 What To Do With The Dink After another great weekend of sailing, snorkeling, barbequing, and general partying at Emerald Bay at Catalina Island, getting ready to go home is a drag. We start the routine around 11:30, to wait for the predictable San Pedro Channel trade winds to fill in. First, we retrieve and put away the flopper stopper, then I stow the Honda generator, and the eight horse Yamaha, haul the kayaks aboard, and uncover the main. Last but not least is the dinghy. I used to tow my 10 foot inflatable Quicksilver and take care of it when I got to home port. But I didn’t like the effect it had on my sailing performance. I hauled it aboard and laid it on the foredeck a few times, but up there it gets in the way and is a

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Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver

Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver Roger Cheney 2/1/2005 Hull #: 132 Faithful readers of this column [others are to be pitied!] may recall an earlier brief article [May ’03] in which Wallace Shakun [Morning Star, C380 #12] proposed using a heavy-duty cordless drill to drive winches. He put the idea into practice using a straight-drive 1/2″ Bosch drill together with an adapter “bit”, which he developed, that mates a standard 1/2″ chuck with our winch drive socket. The idea sounded good to me, except that I felt a right-angle drill would provide an easier way to resist the high torques developed [about 500 inch-pounds]. Wallace indicated that the straight-drive version worked well, but that he was also considering the right-angle approach. Milwaukee now has a hefty right-angle drill, which develops a “bit” more torque, and which costs somewhat more [$300 vs $200]. Roger Cheney [C380 #132, “2nd Wind”] has

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Maxwell Windlass Issues

Maxwell Windlass Warren Elliott 5/1/2005 Hull #: 44 There’s been quite a lot of discussion on our email list concerning operating problems with our windlasses. These are principally the clutch not releasing, jamming when rope/chain splices transit the chainwheel with the “Freedom” version and failure/stalling of the unit. To release “stuck” clutches, some captains have had to undertake some severe hammer work, as advised by Maxwell. The answer here seems to be proper maintenance, with at least annual cleaning and greasing required. The rope/chain splice problem is best minimized by having a good, professional “thin” splice made up. Some captains report that pulling the anchor line during the critical splice transit helps. A great way around both of these issues is to go to an all chain rode and add a down switch. This way, there is no splice to jam, and the clutch never needs adjusting, just leave it

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Companionway Door Options – Mainsheet August 2005

Companionway Door Options Author:Warren Elliott 8/1/2005 Hull #: 44 Mainsheet August 2005 Hi C380+ Captains, Admirals and Crews– Here in the N.E,. thankfully, the new season is in full swing, with nice warm temps and some fair winds. Trust you’re all enjoying sailing. But, if anything is preventing your getting-out-there boat-wise, please contact me or sign into our Sailnet.com email discussion list where there’s a lot of captains ready to help. This Mainsheet issue is devoted to four companionway treatments, most of which are “doors”. I must confess that I received much of the info a couple of years ago, so some of it is a bit dated, but still applicable. My apologies to the four captains, who may have expected to see their handiwork “somewhat” earlier. The first article is a fairly detailed one from Tom and Barbara Lincoln, who were sailing in the Bahamas. Lately, they are “sailing”

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Maxwell Windlass – Mainsheet May 2005

Maxwell Windlass Warren Elliott 5/1/2005 Hull #: 44 Maxwell Windlass There’s been quite a lot of discussion on our email list concerning operating problems with our windlasses. These are principally the clutch not releasing, jamming when rope/chain splices transit the chainwheel with the “Freedom” version and failure/stalling of the unit. To release “stuck” clutches, some captains have had to undertake some severe hammer work, as advised by Maxwell. The answer here seems to be proper maintenance, with at least annual cleaning and greasing required. The rope/chain splice problem is best minimized by having a good, professional “thin” splice made up. Some captains report that pulling the anchor line during the critical splice transit helps. A great way around both of these issues is to go to an all chain rode and add a down switch. This way, there is no splice to jam, and the clutch never needs adjusting, just

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Boat Speed Under Power – Mainsheet May 2005

Title:Boat Speed Under Power Author:Jim Jaeschke Date: 5/1/2005 Hull #: 73 Boat Speed Under Power – Engine/Transmission/Propeller Performance There has been a few lively discussions on the Sailnet C380+ list about how fast and at what RPM our boats will move under engine power. The bottom line is that your boat should cruise at 7+ knots at engine rev’s that promote long life. I’ll try to help you get there by discussing prop characteristics, tying in engine performance and, for the practical side: tachometer and boat speed instrumentation. Instrumentation In order to know our boat’s motoring performance, we need reasonably accurate instrumentation. It has been reported that the tachometer on some boats has not been calibrated, resulting in erroneous RPM readings. It is important, not only for this discussion but also for engine life, that the tach indicate engine RPM correctly. If you suspect a problem, have your boat yard

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