Refrigerator Upgrade

Refrigerator Upgrade Bob Swanson March, 2006 Hull #: 349 Bob and Janet Swanson onboard English Rose, C 380 #349, came up with a simple solution to an irksome problem. The refrigerator on most of our boats have a removable shelf near the bottom [unlike my older horizontal freezer version], with space for sodas, etc. underneath. Below-shelf access is troublesome at best, requiring removal of just about everything sitting on top of it. Their solution, as shown in the photo: cut off the front part of the shelf [about 1/3], and reinstall it as a two-piece shelf. Removing only the front part of the shelf [requiring removing much less of the items stored above] allows reasonable access to all items below.

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More on Hatch Screen Hinges

More on Hatch Screen Hinges Bob Bierly February, 2006 Hull #: 255 Faithful readers of this column will recall the November 2004 issue wherein I extol the virtues of always-installed hatch screens. This marvelous condition excites a euphoric state wherein captain and crew find they no longer need to scrounge precious storage areas for their hatch screens, no more will they suffer skinned knuckles or stubbed toes while trying to unearth the very same screens from their forgotten, illgained resting places. Our boating stalwarts can dismiss ugly memories of installing their screens a thousand times, most requiring some awkward twist or arch of the back, eliciting visions of endless therapy, and they can reject head-gashing reminders when those dastardly items fell, causing untold call-911-type pain together with suspicion of the need for near record stitches administered by Dr. Frankenstein. No, this is all in the past! Now our heros

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Long Term Cruising Mods

Long Term Cruising Mods Cliff & Deb Mewdell February, 2006 Hull: 332 Hello From the Bahamas! After months of talking and planning, a lot of shopping, fixing and stuffing the boat, plus a couple of months moving down the ICW, we finally made it “across” [the Gulf Stream] to the Bahamas Islands. Admiral Jeanne & I aboard My Bride II, along with buddy-boats Valkyrie, English Rose, and part-timers Albicilla and Watermark I, have done a lot, seen a lot, encountered a lot, and hopefully have learned something!. But all this is, as is said, a story for another day. However, at least sunrise of that day may have arrived with the printing of Commodore Earle’s [Valkyrie] column herein. So peruse that for all the associations doin’s, possibly including some of its officers adventures. On to the tech stuff. We first met Canadian cruisers Cliff & Debra Mewdell aboard Watermark

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Enlarged Drop Leaf Salon Table

Enlarged Drop Leaf Salon Table Paul McManus November, 2006 Hull #: 185 Enlarged Salon Table with Drop-Down Leaves Shortly after we took delivery of “Sea Sea Rider” , we were on our friends’ Catalina 36. They had replaced their salon table with one that had drop-down leaves. Figure 1 The Admiral immediately put a new salon table on the boat project list, where it remained for a couple of years. Finally, a couple of years ago, the Admiral put her foot down and mandated that no more boat projects could be done until we had a new salon table. Problem for me was that our C36 friend had built his teak salon table himself and had done a beautiful job. I didn’t have the skill or the tools to do that. We had also decided we wanted an extension to expand the table so that we could sit our

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Diesel Fuel Hydronic Heater

Diesel Fuel Hydronic Heater Paul McManus February, 2006 Hull #: 185 The following was submitted by Paul McManus. whose C380 resides in the Seattle area where the often-cool [cold?] weather makes a boat heater a very nice feature. Here’s his description of the installation. Why a Hydronic Diesel Heater- There was never a question about whether Sea Sea Rider would have a heater. The Admiral does not like to be cold and, since this was our first boat, I wanted to make sure she was comfortable. The decision to put a hydronic diesel heater in was driven by several factors. First, we had spent some time with friends on their C42 which had a hydronic heater and found it very comfortable. Next, I liked the idea of running small [hot-water] hoses instead of the large [hot-air] ducts required by air systems. I also preferred individual thermostats for each cabin, an

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Cruising Made Easier

Cruising Made Easier Warren Elliott November, 2006 Hull #: 44 Recently, the admiral and I were musing about the modifications and “stuff” we’ve added to our C380 [#44], My Bride II. After 10 years, it’s quite a bit and, as you can imagine, there’s always more that can add to our cruising pleasure. So, in case you’ve missed some of these, here’s a list of my favorites, roughly in order of cost; they range from zero cost to some “big boat bucks”. With apologies to racers, these are geared to making cruising easier and/or just more pleasurable. Feel free to let me know your favorite[s] if you don’t see your’s below. Note that we have not installed all of these, but have most. “[Mainsheet]” means there’s an article on the subject which can either be found in earlier issues or on our website at www.catalina380.org. Click on Boat Related, then

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Improved Ties For Portlight Curtains

Improved Ties For Portlight Curtains Bob Bierly August, 2006 Hull #: 255 Many of you have probably experienced the wearing out of those dainty little strips of velcro provided by Mother Catalina to hold the accordion / pleated curtains for the opening and fixed ports. Not only have mine died, but I never did like them anyway as two hands were generally insufficient to fold up the shade and pull down on two or more velcro tabs. [Note: your editor also finds them a bit of a pain: to reset any shade it’s difficult to retrieve the underneath tab- Warren] So, here’s a simple, cheap and effective fix requiring little work, not much material and even less talent. For each port you need ten inches of flat elastic material about 1/2 inch wide. Cut the elastic into two 5- inch pieces. Form a loop by overlapping each 5 inch piece

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Windlass Alert

Windlass Alert Warren Elliott November, 2006 Hull #: 44 There has been considerable traffic on our Sailnet email discussion group on this subject. Captains are finding problems ranging from clutch lockups to windlass slowdown/ failure, so I thought I’d give a brief overview of the problems and solutions, before more of you “suffer”–and there has been some suffering! Changing gear oil has also been batted around, but this is much less important, per the manufacturer, Maxwell. Note that I hope to have a fuller article on this in the near future. There are two windlass models within our fleet: the “Freedom 800″ and the “VW 800″; early C380’s have the latter unit, but horizontally mounted. Boats from about late 1997 to 2002 have the Freedom model, and later C380’s and C387’s have the VW 800, vertically mounted. Captains with the Freedom windlass have reported more problems than others, probably because

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Is Tachometer Accurate?

Is Tachometer Accurate? Richard Herbst Date: November, 2006 Hull #: 93 I recently suspected that my helm’s tach was inaccurate. After investigating, I found as much as 1300 RPM error near the high end! The tachometer’s input signal comes from an upgraded alternator on my Westerbeke 42B engine, a Balmar model 91-100. So, if there’s an upgraded alternator in use, you could have a big tachometer error. I found the error by using a $65.00 digital “Diesel Tiny Tach” from Design Technology Inc (www.tinytach.com) which claims an accuracy of +/- 10 RPM. My order included a longer cable [$10, + about $7 shipping], which allows the indicator to reach the helm. The Tiny Tach is powered by a 9-volt battery; its transducer clamps onto an injector’s fuel line, measuring the pulses of injected fuel to determine RPM. The unit can be set up permanently or connected when needed. I used

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Winter Covers

Winter Covers Richard Herbst & Warren Elliott August, 2006 Hull #: 93 & 44 I know August is a bit too warm to think about this subject, but think about my perspective. It’s now June and quite warm here in southern NY, and I’ve just returned from many months in the warm Bahamas and southeastern U.S., so I really don’t have winter even vaguely in mind. But, duty calls! And when you read this, cold weather won’t be far behind, at least in northern climes. This article was submitted by Richard Herbst, a C380 captain from N.J., where winters are real. This is for those looking for inexpensive protection for that prized sailboat. Why Cover Your Boat? In many areas, winter weather causes water to cyclically freeze/ expand and melt/contract.. Over time, this can lift and destroy various parts, including tabbing that holds bulkheads to the hull. The rate of

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