Owner Improvements

The list below provides links to owner websites and their descriptions of improvements they have made to various aspects of the Catalina 380 series. I include them in this post so that they will be available to the search routines of this site. RIGGING Spinnaker Rig Details – Som Sikdar Whisker Pole – Paul McManus In Boom Furler – Kevin Murray Back Stay Adjuster – Kevin Murray Double Footblock – Som Sikdar Boom Brake – Kevin Murray Preventer – Som Sikdar Power Primary Winch – Kevin Murray Mainsheet Cam Cleat – Kevin Murray Jib Furler Line Clutch – Kevin Murray Go Fast Rigging – Steve Dublin Bobstay – Kevin Murray STAINLESS Stern Handrails -John Estes Stainless Projects – Scott Brear CREATURE COMFORT Drop Leaf Salon Table– Jim Jaeschke Table Tray – Robert Taylor Sink Boards – Kevin Murray Stove Cover Board – Robert Taylor Cabin Storage – Som Sikdar Fridge

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.

Dutchman Boom Brake Installation and Use – Mainsheet May 2005

Dutchman Boom Brake Installation and Use Kevin Murray Mainsheet Date: 5/1/2005 Hull #: 88 The Dutchman Boom Brake is designed to control the speed of the boom as it crosses the boat during jibing. This can be a dangerous situation in moderate or higher winds. It also makes a great preventer for use when running downwind. As shown in Figure 1, this brake consists of three sheaves mounted between two plates in a triangular configuration; a line wraps around these in a serpentine fashion. The two upper sheaves are fixed and do not rotate; the lower sheave either rotates or is fixed depending on the setting of the control knob on the front of the device. When the line running through the brake is tensioned, it grips the line with greater tension yielding more grip. By adjusting the knob and/or tension, more or less braking friction is in winds below

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.

Furling Main Maintenance

Furling Main Maintenance Earle Ellefsen November, 2005 Hull #: 271 Our Commodore, Earle Ellefsen [C380 #271, Valkyrie], discovered chafe near one end of his mainsail furling line. He decided to turn the line end-for-end, and remove the chafed area as there was excess line length. The key step in accomplishing this was to remove the bolt, which locks-in the furling line, near the bottom of the furler. Of course, an “opportunity” soon arose when Earle realized that the bolt was Stainless Steel in an aluminum furler and, with a few years of salt-water environment, was thoroughly corroded in-place. Many shots of WD-40 later, nothing had changed! Early attempts at removal quickly resulted in losing the slot– or, as Earle put it: “it torqued open”. Obviously the bolt should have had a more substantial gripping head. Once the slot was destroyed, heavy locking pliers are the obvious choice, right? Wrong– their

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.

Fix For Boom / Bimini Interference

Title: Fix For Boom / Bimini Interference Author: Warren Elliott Date: 5/14/2003 Hull #: 44 You may recall that the interference between the boom and doger was discussed in last year’s February Mainsheet. Briefly, at about hull # 100, manufacturer of the spars was changed from ZSpar to US Spars. The new masts have their boom several inches lower, resulting in the potential for the boom to contact the bimini, and perhaps dodger, when sailing close hauled. This problem apparently does not occur for in-mast furlers, probably because those mainsails are cut several inches shorter in the leech in order for them to furl properly. [emember_protected] At the Atlantic City Boat Show, I spoke with Gerry Douglas, Chief Engineer at Catalina, who indicated that they have come up with a fix: ship Catalina [Calif. factory] your mainsail, they

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.

Steering, Boom Height, Cleats, GPS

STEERING, BOOM HEIGHT, CLEATS, GPS Wolfgang Doebel, Warren Elliott 2/1/2002 Hull #: 336 The following was emailed to me from a new 380 owner from Canada: Hello Warren, Have you ever come across one of the following? Do you have any ideas to help? The steering mechanism on my C380, at times seems, to get partially hung up, especially when moving through the neutral position. The problem is not severe but it takes out a lot of fun from steering. Also one must always expect some problems to happen if the cause of the concern is not fully understood. There is an Autopilot ST6000 plus connected to the rudder post, but it does not seem to be the cause, as the problem does not exist when traveling under power alone (no pressure on the rudder, not much tension on the cables). I have investigated the mechanical condition of the pedestal

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.

Boom Vang Boom Attachment Problems

Boom Vang Boom Attachment Problems George Ciechanowski 9/1/1998 Hull #: 66 Something to keep an eye on is the screws that attach the boom vang to the boom. The fitting on the end of the vang is secured with two screws and nyloninsert nuts. One of the nuts backed off and released the end of the fitting at the boom. The other screw was still in place but its’ nut was loose. Luckily I noticed the loose fitting before it did any major damage to itself or the boom. Since the vang is in the way of tightening one of the screws I replaced both screws with hex head bolts, washers, and new nuts (you should not reuse nylon insert nuts, they loose their holding power). You gain access to the nuts by way of the inspection plate on the boom but to get to the forward screw to remove

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.

Dutchman/Boom Lift

Dutchman/Boom Lift Dave Peffer 11/1/1997 Hull #: 20 Earlier hull numbers have an adjustable two-part boom lift designed to permit setting up the Dutchman exactly. This has a nasty tendency to shake out of the cam cleat at the end of the boom, and re-setting it with the sail luffing is no picnic. I opted to set the system up perfectly, then whipped the two parts of the boom lift together just above the cam cleat. No more loose line and the whipping can easily be cut when necessary.

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.

Boom Vang Pivot

Boom Vang Pivot Dave Peffer 5/1/1998 Hull #: 20 The pivot at the mast end of the vang turns on a pin held in place by only a cotter pin through the center. Nothing else holds it in place, and the cotter pin is liable to shear, dropping the pivot pin completely out of the fitting and releasing the vang from the mast. Pending a ‘fix’ for this problem, please check the cotter pin for wear and replace it at least once each season.

You need to be logged in to see the rest of this content.  Catalina380-IA members, please login.

To join please fill out a membership application (Association->Membership Application) and send a check to the address on the form.