Wing versus Fin Keel – Discussion

There was considerable discussion on Wing versus Fin Keel, which was best, which had better pointing ability, etc. Here are a couple of the better responses: On Feb 13, 2012, at 9:56 PM, “tvrf_engr”wrote: The C380 is on our short list of boats to look closely at once our current boat sells. I’m very skeptical of shoal-draft keels, as our current boat can’t realize a GPS course inside 50-55 degrees off the wind without iron-genny support. Some 380 owners we’ve talked with have the wing keel and report no significant issues with it sailing upwind, while another has quite the opposite view. Of course, the boats that the Admiral is most attracted to have wing keels! Anyway, I’m interested in hearing some more observations as to the performance of the two versions of keels – especially from anyone who has sailed both. We don’t frequent or long to visit any

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Bridge Clearance

Posted by: “Paul and Carol McManus” 5/20/2009 The bridge clearance for my tall rig is 61′ 3″. My 380 specs say the standard rig is 4′ shorter than the tall rig. My clearance also includes a 2′ 7″ for a VHF antenna. So if have a typical sailboat VHF antenna. Your bridge clearance should be about 57′ 3″. If don’t have a VHF antenna then your wind vane is the tallest point and you can subtract another foot for a clearance of 56′ 3″. By the way I used 5′ 9″ for my water line to base of the mast measurement. I have the Charleston Spar conventional mast. All these dimensions were taken with the boat hauled and the mast unstepped. Paul McManus Sea Sea Rider C380 #185 Port Orchard, WA

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So you want to try the ICW?

So you want to try the ICW? or What to do for your winter vacation! Bob Bierly 5/15/2005 Hull #255 In the February 2005 Mainsheet, Earle Ellefsen, our C380 Commodore was pondering how to prepare for an 8-month trip down the eastern seaboard from New England to Florida and the Bahamas or beyond. Although not having all the answers, my comments will be from the perspective of having made the major part of that trip twice in CMON WIND, our C380 hull #255. Although many pros have written extensively on the subject of an ICW trip, I will offer only my unique perspective and focus on the use of the C380 as a suitable vessel and home. I will use Earle’s rhetorical questions to direct my thoughts into various subjects that all should ponder before embarking. All of this is offered in the sure knowledge that your first trip down

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Northbound from Trinidad

Northbound from Trinidad Jim & Sue Seemann 5/15/2005 Hull #1 Sue and I flew back to Trinidad on Jan 10, 2005, to re-launch our boat (PipeDream) and begin our 2,000 mile voyage back to Florida. Here is our first installment on our northbound trip. Trinidad (Jan 10 to Feb 5) is a beautiful and prosperous tropical island located about 25 miles off the coast of South America and near the eastern border of Venezuela. The island is 10 degrees north of the equator and consequently enjoys a lush tropical climate with expansive rain forests, endless varieties of tropical plants and animals, and an annual celebration known as “Carnival”. We stayed in Chaguaramas, Trinidad for three weeks and enjoyed the island amenities while preparing and provisioning PipeDream for the voyage north. The first leg of our trip (Feb 6 to 11) took us 88 miles north to Grenada. What a contrast!!!

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Caretta Surfs to a 2nd in the Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race

Caretta Surfs to a 2nd in the 30th Annual Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race Steve Dublin Date: 5/15/2005 Hull #: 86 Caretta is a seven year old C-380 with the Z-Spar tall rig and the deeper version of the wing keel. We’ve owned her for about 3 years. We bought Caretta to use primarily for weekend day sails and summer cruises in the Bahamas. But as they say; “He goes among the fever stricken…..” After a few too many rum & cokes, following a win in the “Mother Tub” fleet during Abaco Race Week, we decided to enter Caretta in the next Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race. The sailing instructions for the 30th Annual Key West race required all boats to stay offshore of the reefs that separate Hawke Channel from the Keys. Too many racers had foundered on these reefs at night while trying to duck into

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Cruise The Bahamas in a Catalina 380!!

Cruise The Bahamas in a Catalina 380!! Tom Lincoln 5/15/2005 Hull #1 Some of you might think the 380 is marginal for such a task. Some might think it is necessary to have that heavy-duty ocean tested offshore double-ended battle ship of a cruiser. Put that notion aside. My wife Barb and I have been cruising our C-380 for three years. We departed Lake Erie and navigated the ICW and then jumped off to the Bahamas for the winter months. The C-380 has proven to be up to the task. Our background in sailing is probably like most weekend sailors. We have been sailing since 1970 in small boats. We started with day sailors that we sailed close to our hometown, Fort Thomas in Northern Kentucky, a Suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. We sailed on small lakes and the Ohio River. As members of Brookville Lake Sailing Association, we learned the

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Understanding Polar Diagrams

Posted by: “C Spear” freespearitsailboat Polar diagrams show the boat speed at various points of sail. Let’s look at the innermost curve (labeled 6.0) as an example. Polar_Diagram_387 Wing Keel, 150 Genoa 1. First delete all the other curves in your mind so you are looking at only one curve 2. Now look at the two scales a. The horizontal scale goes from 1 knot to 9 knots – it represents boat speed b. The vertical scale at the bottom represents wind speed from 6.0 to 20 knots c. The numbers on the outside of the half-circle represent the angle you are sailing relative to the true wind direction – straight up (0 degrees) is directly into the wind and straight down (180 degrees) is dead down wind 3. Back to the inner curve the true wind speed is 6.0 knots (not apparent wind speed) 4. Following that inner

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Winch Rite – Review

Posted by: “Joseph A. Revak, DMD, MAS” joenopain1 Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:01 am (PDT) Steve, I do have the Winch Rite. I only use it for raising the main. It would be to bulky for jib sheeting. I like it for the main. I also have the Tides Marine Strong track system. When I first got the Winch Rite I used the slow speed to raise the Main, now I use the higher speed and it does just fine. A LOT less work for my back. It is usually Diane and I on the boat so, as someone said with the Strong system I could raise the main at the mast easily, but we always raise the Main from the cockpit and there is the additional resistance from the blocks. Where I really like it is at the beginning of the season while I feed the jib into

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XM Satellite Marine Weather

XM Satellite Marine Weather Steve Dublin May, 2008 Hull #: C380 The following article is from Steve Dublin famous for his 380’s ocean racing and Mainsheet front cover – Warren About six months ago, I upgraded the GPS/Chartplotter on my Catalina C-380 “Caretta” to a Garmin model 3206. The new chartplotter was mounted in the cockpit on the pedestal guard. It was networked to Garmin’s GDL 30A XM satellite marine weather receiver, which I installed below deck by the distribution panel. The installation process was very straightforward once I learned how to splice an ethernet connection. The watertight ethernet connectors are too large to snake down a pedestal guard tube. However, Garmin sells a separate connector kit. This allows you to cut off one connector, snake the wire through the tube, and remake a watertight connection. The weather receiver has its own mushroom-type antenna that I mounted on the hoop

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