Westerbeke Notes

Westerbeke Notes Warren Elliott 11/27/2004 Hull #: 44 A few notes for those of us with the Westerbeke 42B. Raw Water Pump. First, there is a new raw water pump, P/N 48080, which is a bit larger but directly replaces the old one, P/N 033636. From our Sailnet discussion group, here’s an email from one captain who went through the exchange: “The seals started to leak on my seawater pump so ordered a new one. Found out Westerbeke had replaced it with larger model. The frame and bolt holes match but the pump is larger, has a higher volume, and the impellers are not interchangeable. Just finished mounting the new one. Keep the 45-degree elbow on the inlet. The new pump comes with the 90 degree fitting on the outlet but not the 45. Everything fit and it works fine. Having the old one rebuilt for a spare. Don’t forget

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More on Spinaker & Jib Poles

More on Spinaker & Jib Poles Warren Elliott May, 2004 Hull #: 44 As a follow-up to Steve’s article, I did some further enquiries on spinnaker/jib poles and cars. For the older C380’s with Z-Spar masts, Julian Crisp at US Spars [was Z-Spar, tel: 386 462-3760] indicates that, for the standard [non-furling] mast, the cost is about $250 for a car and short section of track. They also sell the same track in a long version [4 meters], for those who want to store their boat’s pole on the mast. US Spars’ furling mast uses a simpler approach in which the car can be added directly to the mast groove, and is about $170; installing this car does not require stepping the mast. They also sell complete poles with fittings, at better prices than the big catalog stores, per Julian. [But remember that shipping long items means that a trucking

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Lee Berths for the Aft Cabin

Lee Berths for the Aft Cabin Jos Sonneville 2/1/2004 Hull #: 33 This article is from Jos Sonneville, a C380 captain residing in Holland. He gets out into “blue water” environments and finds a better rough-water sleeping set-up is helpful.–Warren The aft cabin with the wide, comfortable bed is not an easy place to sleep when sailing through the night especially with moderate or serious seas. While it is possible to use, for example, sail bags to create a space where you do not roll around, it is not ideal. So I had been thinking about creating two lee berths in the aft cabin, without structurally changing the cabin. Photo 3 shows an artist’s impression of the concept I came up with: on top of the mattress custom-made canvas lee-cloth ‘cocoons’ are installed. They are fixed on the bed itself by 1-inch webbing that is passed through stainless steel loops

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Filters for Drains

Filters for Drains George LaForge 2/1/2004 Hull #: 147 Regular cleaning of the inline shower bilge strainer is a task that is easily moved down a to-do list. The strainer’s out-of-sight location under the head sink and the difficulty in twisting the filter can contribute to a lack of cleaning. A simple, next-to-nothing cost project to prolong the cleaning interval is to silicone caulk a piece of nylon window screen over the drain in the shower stall. A quick wipe of the screen with a piece of tissue removes materials and hair that would otherwise be trapped in the under sink strainer. Measure and cut a piece of nylon window screen the same dimensions as the shower’s stainless steel drain cover. Run a thin bead of silicone caulk around the edge of the drain plate and a few of the bars in the grid. Press the screen onto the drain

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Automating Refrigerator Startup and Shutdown with a Battery Combiner

Automating Refrigerator Startup and Shutdown with a Battery Combiner George LaForge 2/1/2004 Hull #: 147Â We only run the refrigerator on Freebird when power is available from a charging source. That source is either dockside power or the engine alternator. I try never to run the refrigerator only from battery power. [George- maybe your fridge needs an insulation upgrade; Catalina has a procedure for installing expandable foam–Warren]. Not wanting to run down a battery, yet at the same time wanting to keep beverages cold, we developed a routine: as soon as the engine was started someone would need to go below and switch on the circuit breaker for the refrigerator. And after the engine was shut down someone would need to go below and switch off the breaker. Most of the time the problem was remembering to switch the breaker on when the engine was started. One day while researching

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Hatch and Portlight Issues

Hatch And Portlight Issues Warren Elliott 2/1/2004 Hull #: 44 While most of us realize that our hatches and portlights will not last forever, on the other hand a certain, and at least moderate, period of trouble-free performance is expected for new equipment. This is apparently not the case with regard to crazing of the acrylic. To be sure there’s also problems with leaks–there always will be with any exposed openable equipment on a boat. But crazing, a natural, usually slow, deterioration of the acrylic where fine lines appear randomly, should not strike for a few years. And when it does, we should see only minor amounts adding slowly over the years. Of course, this will vary depending principally on exposure to sunlight, so those of you in southern climes are most susceptible. However, quite a large group of your fellow captains have indicated significant crazing appearing in their acrylics,

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Remote Oil Filter

Remote Oil Filter Earl Poe 5/1/2004 Hull #: 140 Remote Oil Filter The oil filters on both of our fleets engine types [Westerbeke and Yanmar] are horizontally mounted, resulting in some oil spillage when changing filters. This remote adapter allows you to relocate the filter so that its feed/return end is up, avoiding any messy spills. Further, the filters location on our Westerbekes is a bit awkward, as Captain Earl Poe so aptly describes below, so the remote filter also allows for a much more “ergonomic” location. –Warren The idea of a remote location for mounting an oil filter was first investigated by Tom Lincoln on Ridge Runner, so he gets the credit. The servicing of our oil filters is, to say the least, awful! Mounting the filter in a vertical direction on an easily accessible bulkhead would save time, knuckles, and the environment. Covich-Williams (800-833-3132) of Seattle sells just

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Smart Fuel Gauge

Smart Fuel Gauge Earle Ellefsen 5/1/2004 Hull #: 271 The following is from Earl Effelsen –Warren I have always kept a fuel log for our 2000 C380 (#271), Valkyrie, and know that fuel consumption can range from 0.6 to 1.0 gph (average 0.85 gph) depending on conditions. I am also well aware that the stock fuel gauge is not linear and that, although my tank is rated at 34 gals, when the gauge reads 1/4, there are only about four gals remaining. So, I was particularly annoyed when I recently ran out of fuel despite my calculations indicating that I should still have another hours worth of fuel. At about this time, I saw an ad for the Cruz Pro FU30 Smart Fuel Gauge and ordered one from the e-Marine, Inc. web site for $169. This gauge learns the shape of the tank and, via its digital readout, can accurately

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Engine Preventive Maintenance

Engine Preventive Maintenance George LaForge 5/1/2004 Hull #: 147 Recently, on the SailNet C380 discussion list, there was mention of chaffing of engine hoses. You’ll appreciate the minimal expense and time involved in adding chaffing protection to your engine’s cooling and fuel hoses. If you need to purchase a replacement hose from Westerbeke or Yanmar, be prepared for sticker shock. To protect the hoses, buy a few feet of one-inch diameter clear hose and a package of eight-inch plastic wire ties from Home Depot or Lowes. You’ll be surprised by the amount of hose needed. Inspect every hose for potential contact with other objects. Where one does touch [or might with vibration], cut a piece of the clear tubing long enough to protect the engine hose, split the tubing length-wise, and secure the tubing to the hose with a couple of wire ties. Trim the ties using wire cutters. On

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Basic “Go-Fasts” For The C380

Basic “Go-Fasts” For The C380 Steve Dublin 5/1/2004 Hull #: 84 We’ve found our C-380, “Caretta” (hull # 84), to be a very able club racer, particularly in offshore events. When her skipper and crew are reasonably attentive, she can sail to her 120 PHRF rating. The stock Catalina 380 comes well fitted out with sail handling gear. However, there are some basic “go fasts” (racing equipment), which can be easily added, to help the boat sail her to her full potential. I’ve described a few of these “go fasts” below along with some installation tips learned the hard way: Adjustable Backstay Photo 3 The C-380 does not have a “bendy” rig. However, a pincer block assembly (Photo 3), connected to a 4 to 1 block & tackle, will allow you to tighten the forestay and point a little higher in moderate sea conditions. You don’t have to drill any

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