ChartGuides Update: ICW

[Editor: This comes from a long-time C380 owner.  The content should be of interest to members given the experience of Bob Bierly who sent it to the list serve.]

Folks,

As a “public service” to those  few east coast sailors  who may be looking to make that first big trip south, I pass along this semi commercial message from publishers of the best anchor and waterway guide publications I have found. (Barbara and Doug Leinhard on SV Melinda Kay might want to comment). The message says it all.

Bob Bierly

From: diana@semi-local.com To: bojabierly2@aol.com Sent: 9/1/2014 5:54:24 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time Subj: On the Water ChartGuides Update: ICW AnchorGuides SECOND EDITION Now Available

On the Water ChartGuides Update: ICW AnchorGuides SECOND EDITION Now Available

Hi Bob,

This summer we were thrilled when Practical Sailor magazine, the “Consumer Reports” of all things marine, awarded our Cruise Guide and Anchor Guide series

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Winch Rite — Review

Posted by: “Joseph A. Revak, DMD, MAS” joenopain1@verizon.net joenopain1
Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:01 am (PDT)

I do have the Winch Rite. I only use it for raising the main. It would be to bulky for jib sheeting. I like it for the main. I also have the Tides Marine Strong track system. When I first got the Winch Rite I used the slow speed to raise the Main, now I use the higher speed and it does just fine. A LOT less work for my back. It is usually Diane and I on the boat so, as someone said with the Strong system I could raise the main at the mast easily, but we always raise the Main from the cockpit and there is the additional resistance from the blocks.

Where I really like it is at the beginning of the season while I feed the jib into the

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Winch Rite – Review

Posted by: “Joseph A. Revak, DMD, MAS” joenopain1@verizon.net joenopain1
Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:01 am (PDT)

Steve,
I do have the Winch Rite. I only use it for raising the main. It would be to bulky for jib sheeting. I like it for the main. I also have the Tides Marine Strong track system. When I first got the Winch Rite I used the slow speed to raise the Main, now I use the higher speed and it does just fine. A LOT less work for my back. It is usually Diane and I on the boat so, as someone said with the Strong system I could raise the main at the mast easily, but we always raise the Main from the cockpit and there is the additional resistance from the blocks.

Where I really like it is at the beginning of the season while I feed the jib into the furling slot, Diane can raise the jib’s halyard, which she had difficulties doing with a winch. I have not seen the electric winch handle on the bikini model. Warren I have seen some REALLY great premolars and molars lately though!
I hope every one is out on the water,
Joe Revak, C-387 # 74

XM Satellite Marine Weather

XM Satellite Marine Weather
Steve Dublin
May, 2008
Hull #: C380

The following article is from Steve Dublin famous for his 380’s ocean racing and Mainsheet front cover – Warren

About six months ago, I upgraded the GPS/Chartplotter on my Catalina C-380 “Caretta” to a Garmin model 3206. The new chartplotter was mounted in the cockpit on the pedestal guard. It was networked to Garmin’s GDL 30A XM satellite marine weather receiver, which I installed below deck by the distribution panel. The installation process was very straightforward once I learned how to splice an ethernet connection. The watertight ethernet connectors are too large to snake down a pedestal guard tube.

However, Garmin sells a separate connector kit. This allows you to cut off one connector, snake the wire through the tube, and remake a watertight connection. The weather receiver has its own mushroom-type antenna that I mounted on the hoop

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Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver

Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver
Roger Cheney

2/1/2005 Hull #: 132

Faithful readers of this column [others are to be pitied!] may recall an earlier brief article [May ’03] in which Wallace Shakun [Morning Star, C380 #12] proposed using a heavy-duty cordless drill to drive winches. He put the idea into practice using a straight-drive 1/2″ Bosch drill together with an adapter “bit”, which he developed, that mates a standard 1/2″ chuck with our winch drive socket.

The idea sounded good to me, except that I felt a right-angle drill would provide an easier way to resist the high torques developed [about 500 inch-pounds]. Wallace indicated that the straight-drive version worked well, but that he was also considering the right-angle approach.

Milwaukee now has a hefty right-angle drill, which develops a “bit” more torque, and which costs somewhat more [$300 vs $200]. Roger Cheney [C380 #132, “2nd Wind”] has

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Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver – Mainsheet February 2005

Affordable Cordless Drill as Winch Driver
Roger Cheney
2/1/2005
Hull #: 132 

Faithful readers of this column [others are to be pitied!] may recall an earlier brief article [May ’03] in which Wallace Shakun [Morning Star, C380 #12] proposed using a heavy-duty cordless drill to drive winches. He put the idea into practice using a straight-drive 1/2″ Bosch drill together with an adapter “bit”, which he developed, that mates a standard 1/2″ chuck with our winch drive socket.

The idea sounded good to me, except that I felt a right-angle drill would provide an easier way to resist the high torques developed [about 500 inch-pounds]. Wallace indicated that the straight-drive version worked well, but that he was also considering the right-angle approach.

Milwaukee now has a hefty right-angle drill, which develops a “bit” more torque, and which costs somewhat more [$300 vs $200]. Roger Cheney [C380 #132, “2nd Wind”] has

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In-Mast Furling

In-Mast Furling
Warren Elliott & Ted Yaeger
8/1/2002
Hull #: 37

Several of our 380/390 captains on our Sailnet email discussion group have in-mast furling and have mentioned how they like the arrangement. Some of those without this feature, including me, have usually responded with some “buts”: but there are no battens [so less sailing efficiency], but there’s less sail area [46 sq. ft. less: about 13%], but they jam, but, etc. Some said that a better alternative is in-boom furlers, which have become a lot more reliable, and are much less expensive to retrofit. Of course, buying a new Catalina with either system installed is better than retrofitting; here, in-boom costs more than in-mast. [For the latest on in-boom furlers, see Practical Sailor, Oct. 1, 2001].

I had seen some 380’s with in-mast furling, but had not really dug deeper. Then Earle and Barbara Ellefsen [C380 # 271 “Valkyrie”],

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